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Sentient Research Presents New Study Results and Entertainment Education Program at the 2016 National Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention Conference
09-20-2016

 

1. Factors of Successful Linkage and Retention to HIV Care in a National HIV Testing and Linkage Program

AHF Linkage Study PosterUnderstanding which factors inherent to clients or service settings are predictive of successful linkage and retention can lead to better outcomes along the HIV care continuum. We extracted HIV testing and clinical data from a major HIV/AIDS service organization’s electronic medical record system for clients testing positive at the organization, and for clients referred from other agencies for linkage into care. Cases (n=8,521) from October 2008 through January 2015 were included in the analysis. We assessed linkage, retention, antiretroviral prescriptions, and viral suppression based on CDC definitions and conducted a logistic regression to identify factors predictive of successful linkage and retention.

The majority (77.1%) of clients were linked into care within 90 days of testing HIV positive; 61.9% were prescribed antiretrovirals, 54.3% were retained in care, and 41.0% reached viral suppression. The odds of linking among older age groups were 2 or more times (OR 2.00 to 2.80; p<.01) that of clients age 20 or younger; the odds of Hispanics linking were less (OR: 0.61, 95% CI: 0.42 – 0.89) compared to Whites; the odds of linking clients that tested at a fixed storefront were 1.48 times (95% CI: 1.03 – 2.12). The odds of retaining homeless clients were less (OR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.19 – 0.72) compared to non-homeless clients; the odds of retaining clients with a new diagnosis were 6.58 times (95% CI: 3.25 – 13.30) compared to clients previously diagnosed. While a majority of clients were linked and retained into care, areas for improvement remain. We are increasing linkage efforts for younger and Hispanic clients, and those using mobile testing and increasing retention efforts for homeless clients and those with an existing HIV diagnosis.

Citation: Factors of Successful Linkage and Retention to HIV Care in a National HIV Testing and Linkage Program
Montoya J, Plant A, Chien M, Gorre M, Mizuno L, McGrath M, Engeran-Cordova W. Poster presented at: 2016 STD Prevention Conference; September 20-23, 2016; Atlanta, Georgia.

 

2. The Impact of Marketing Campaigns on Condom Use and HIV and STD Testing in the Los Angeles Market
We conducted a cross-sectional street-intercept interview survey to evaluate several marketing campaigns of a large HIV/AIDS service organization in 2014. The survey measured demographics, awareness of campaigns, HIV/STD testing behavior, condom use, and sexual risk behaviors. A convenience sample of 719 respondents completed the survey. Bivariate analyses and logistic regressions were used to assess the relationship between campaign awareness and desired campaign outcomes, HIV/STD testing and condom use.

Campaign awareness of four campaigns ranged between 11.8% and 33.8%. Three of these campaigns were significantly associated with having tested for HIV or STDs in the last 6 months in bivariate analyses. Awareness of any of the organization’s campaigns was significantly associated with HIV testing and STD testing in the past 6 months in bivariate analyses. No association was found between any of the campaigns and condom use. In logistic regressions, awareness one of the campaigns was significantly associated with having tested for HIV in the past 6 months (OR: 1.76).These evaluation results suggests that sustained, targeted marketing campaigns can impact HIV and STD testing among at-risk populations.

Citation: The Impact of Marketing Campaigns on Condom Use and HIV and STD Testing in the Los Angeles Market
Montoya J, Plant A, Conard R. Oral presentation at: 2016 STD Prevention Conference; September 20-23, 2016; Atlanta, Georgia.

 

3. Plan A: An Adaptation of Safe in the City to Prevent STDs and Unintended Pregnancies Among Older Adolescents

Plan A posterOlder adolescent African-American and Latina females experience disproportionately high rates of unintended pregnancies and STDs. We created a new video intervention for this population by adapting the model created for Safe in the City, a soap-opera style video found to reduce STD infections among clinic patients by nearly 10%. We developed Plan A from 2015 to 2016, using an iterative process including a reproductive health clinic staff survey (n=8) and feedback from several subject matter experts. The target audience of African-American and Latina women age 18-19 provided input throughout program development, beginning with 3 focus groups and subsequently through a 9-person review panel that provided detailed feedback on multiple script drafts and program elements. We hired a professional screenwriter and production company to produce a television-quality video. Safe in the City provided a model to create a new entertainment-education intervention for a different audience and to address pregnancy prevention as well as STDs. Heavy target audience involvement, input from stakeholders, and an iterative process were vital to developing the video. Plan A will be evaluated in a randomized controlled trial from 2016 through 2019.

Citation: An Adaptation of Safe in the City to Prevent STDs and Unintended Pregnancies Among Older Adolescents
Plant A, Montoya J, Coyle K, Gaarde J, Rietmeijer C. Poster presented at: 2016 STD Prevention Conference; September 20-23, 2016; Atlanta, Georgia.

 

4. Using Qualitative Research to Improve Sexual Health Services for Students in the Los Angeles Unified School District

Focus Groups PosterSexual health services (SHS) are often underutilized by students in the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). We used qualitative research to better understand student knowledge and attitudes towards HIV/STDs and SHS, with the aim of improving service utilization and reducing HIV/STD infections among students, including young men who have sex with men (YMSM). We conducted nine focus groups from July 2014 through March 2015 at nine different high schools with a wellness center on campus. Participants were recruited from gay-straight alliance clubs and through wellness center staff. Discussion topics included knowledge and attitudes about HIV/STDs and testing, school and community SHS, and each school’s condom availability program. Participants (n=43) were all male; 98% were Latino or African-American. Participants received a $10 gift card. Qualitative data were analyzed inductively for themes.

Participants reported low concern for HIV and STDs and infrequent testing among peers. Students could generally identify some community HIV/STD testing resources, but few mentioned their campus wellness center, even though all wellness centers offer testing. General knowledge of wellness center services, including that services are free and confidential, was low. Suggestions to increase SHS usage at wellness centers included frequent reminders that these services are available, promoting HIV/STD testing along with non-SHS services offered, emphasizing that services are confidential and free, and making appointments easier. Many suggested normalizing HIV/STD testing through sustained promotion to all students. Some participants felt that targeting YMSM separately could be stigmatizing. Participants had favorable views of the condom availability program, which most said was well promoted and widely utilized.

Citation: Using Qualitative Research to Improve Sexual Health Services for Students in the Los Angeles Unified School District
Plant A, Montoya J, Renteria R, Wasson E, Kordic T. Poster presented at: 2016 STD Prevention Conference; September 20-23, 2016; Atlanta, Georgia.

 

 

 

 

 
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